the mythos of lost dynasties - mythos of lost dynasties b
mythos of lost dynasties series b
    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)


    • mythos of lost dynasties series #1


      when looking at gu's paintings, the deconstructe chinese characters inhibit the viewer's attempt to interpret the character's exact meaning. rather, the viewers are forced to face the “tushi” and to challenge preconceived notions of significance through word image. in many cases, gu's paintings are pure imagery of chinese written characters. these characters have been taken away from their original function to play a syntactical part in a sentence, they are detached, synthesized, misplaced, overlapped, miswritten, negated, and inverted to create an uncertain world.


      by rendering the uncertainty of the world. gu wants viewers to feel dissatisfied with what they already know and to continue exploring the unknown world which, according to his words, includes“the nonobjective, uncertain, even the unspeakable feeling of human existence.” gu's pseudo-characters allow the viewer to be stimulated by their vague and variegated elements. the viewer is able to create their own meanings and establish their own aesthetic interpretation of the paintings. although gu is not the first chinese artist to create abstract paintings, he is the first chinese artist in mainland china to receive international recognition due to his conceptualized abstraction in ink. by creating an artistic schema, gu's silent presentation always aims at the innermost realm of the individual's incomprehensible mind. his goal is to provide the viewer with a mystical inner-experience beyond clear comprehension.


      xu gan,

      professor of art history, maine college of art

      mythos of lost dynasties b series#1 - #30

      (pseudo-seal script in ancient wrap)

      wenda gu studio, zhejiang academy of arts, hangzhou, china 1983-1986

      splash ink calligraphic painting

      ink on rice paper, rice paper mounting

      24inches wide x 48inches high(each)